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TNTP Re-imagine Teaching

Hither and Yon: The Value of Rural Place

The founder of Rural Schools Collaborative discusses why he believes public schools might be the best bets we have for strengthening rural America.

Ryan Fowler

Three Ways to Diversify the Teaching Profession

We’re never going to diversify teaching until we diversify teacher preparation. To do that, we need to overcome three obstacles.

Dan Weisberg

Why Buffalo is “All In” for Upending the Opportunity Myth

In The Opportunity Myth, TNTP partnered with five anonymous school systems across the country to understand how students were experiencing the school day. In a candid interview, Buffalo Public Schools publicly names that they are one of those school systems.

Tequilla Brownie

Making Our Schools Safe for All Students and Teachers

The Trump Administration's latest proposal to erase transgender students is nothing short of bigotry.

Diana M. Ward

The Opportunity Myth: From Conversation to Action

More than 1,500 students, educators, parents, and leaders have taken the first step to making sure that more students have better experiences in school.

Editorial Staff

What If We Better Understood How Students Experience School? 

In our upcoming national report, we take the radical step—for us and for our field at large—of asking kids themselves about their schooling.

Amanda Kocon

How Teachers Unions Could Win by Losing Janus

Teachers unions are now forced to confront an existential threat that’s been brewing for years: They’re losing touch with more and more of their members.

Dan Weisberg

What Is Your School’s Dress Code Telling Students?

When we tell students they have to "be this" or "look like that" to succeed, we are using our power to minimize and dehumanize young people.

Kenya Bradshaw

I’m an Ignored Student at an Ignored School, and I’m Reclaiming My Voice

An eighth-grader reflects on educational equity: “As I’ve started thinking more about my future, I’ve had to realize who I’m competing against: people with more resources, more exposure, and more support.”

Julie Hajducky

A Student Asks: ‘Are Decision Makers Finally Going to Listen to Us?’

Real student voice occurs when students are present, active, and an equal part of the decision-making processes.

David Goncharuk

To Close the Teacher Diversity Gap, Start with Education Schools

CEO Dan Weisberg considers the gap between the number of teachers and students of color—and the role teacher education programs play in perpetuating it.

Dan Weisberg

Do We Love Our Children Enough to Stop School Shootings?

Mass shootings in America are a public health epidemic that poses a particular threat to our children.

Dan Weisberg

Our Broken Promise to High School Graduates

Unfortunately, there are millions of kids who get through high school, only to find themselves ill-prepared for college-level work.

Dan Weisberg

Standing by Students on the DACA Renewal Deadline

Today marks the last day those eligible can submit their DACA renewal applications.

Dan Weisberg

Sparking a School Discipline Revolution

Cami Anderson shares the Discipline Revolution Project, a new coalition of educators committing to changing our approach to school discipline.

Amanda Kocon

Supporting Students and Teachers to Address Hate

When the president is unwilling, teachers step up to help young people understand the whole truth about our history and the promise of our country.

Dan Weisberg

Greatest Hits of the TNTP Blog

To introduce you to our new blog design, we’ve highlighted nine of our most popular pieces. Let us know—what are you most interested in reading?

Editorial Staff

When Teachers Choose to Teach, Kids Win

Kids win when teachers love where they work, but this fall in New York City, schools with open teaching positions could be forced to hire teachers they didn’t choose.

Dan Weisberg

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