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TNTP
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Brooklyn, NY 11201
Main:  (718) 233-2800
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TNTP Re-imagine Teaching

Why Special Education is a Civil Right

An educator discusses why she considers advocating for the rights of students with disabilities a crucial part of her job.

Ashley Cowger

How Six Kids Respond to Bullying

We asked six Philadelphia kids what they do when they see a classmate being bullied. Here's what they had to say.

Editorial Staff

10 Ways to Teach Black History All Year Round

Our favorite tips, lesson plans, and teaching tools for giving students rich exposure to black history throughout the school year—and not just in February.

Editorial Staff

Immigration Resources For Educators

New policies targeting undocumented immigrants affect many of the school communities we work with, so we’ve compiled a set of resources to support educators in keeping kids safe.

Dan Weisberg

Is Malcolm X in Your Classroom?

One of TNTP’s 2016 Bridge Fellows is visiting schools around the country, asking the students themselves what works, and what doesn’t, when it comes to educating kids who are too often labeled as “at risk.”

Editorial Staff

Once Incarcerated, Now Rewriting Their Futures

Bridge Fellow Marvin Pierre just launched Eight Million Stories, an alternative education and workforce development program for formerly incarcerated young men.

Editorial Staff

Giving Native Communities a Seat at the Education Policy Table

We spoke with the head of the National Indian Education Association to discuss how schools can be better supported to engage productively with Native communities.

Leticia de la Vara

3 Ways Teachers Can Support Special Ed Parents, Like Me

This special ed mom sold her home, quit her job, and hired a lawyer—all to get her son the education he deserved. She believes no parent should have to go through what she did, and has advice for teachers who want to help.

Lia Martin

Why Social Justice Should’ve Been at the Heart of My Teaching, But Wasn’t

Years after leaving the classroom, an educator reflects on the crucial component his teaching lacked: He wasn’t spending enough energy getting to know who his students were.

Steven LaFemina

After the Election, Taking Our Eyes Off the Prize

After a wrenching election season, the reform community is struggling to adjust to a new landscape. However, we must move forward because the needs of teachers, students, and families have not taken a pause.

Dan Weisberg

The Revolutionary Act of Pronunciation

Learning a child’s name enables a teacher to see that individual student, hear their voice, and understand them as a person who deserves the immense power of connecting to their history and identity.

Leticia Hernández-Linares

Raising Parent Voices to Demand a Better Education

As states craft plans to implement ESSA, there is much to learn from the ways organizations like the National Council of La Raza engage families and communities on education.

Leticia de la Vara

Molding Young Kings in Oakland

A unique branch of the Oakland Unified School District focuses on empowering young African American men, steering them away from the criminal justice system, and driving results in the classroom.

Allison Aliaga

His Dream is to “Empower Homies”—Not Demonize Them

2016 Bridge Fellow César A. Cruz envisions an alternative model of education for young people who too often are thought of as less than.

Opening Doors to Science and Technology, on Four Hours of Sleep

Zaitrarrio Collier, a 2016 Bridge Fellow, wants to expand STEM opportunities for young men of color.

Boys of Color Are “Becoming Extinct.” This Bold Thinker Wants to Change That.

As he prepares for his Bridge Fellowship, we sat down with Marvin Pierre to learn more about what drives him to capitalize on the untapped potential of young men of color.

Mapping the School to Prison Pipeline

What changes in our country led to the creation of the school to prison pipeline and the high concentrations of underachieving students in impoverished neighborhoods, towns, and cities that we see today?

Kenya Bradshaw

I Was an Undocumented Student. Now I Teach Them.

As our nation reconciles with immigration reform, a former undocumented student and current teacher reminds us that our action (or inaction) will have dire consequences for hardworking students, teachers, and families.

Ramiro Flores Turrubiates

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