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TNTP
186 Joralemon St., Suite 300 
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Main:  (718) 233-2800
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TNTP Re-imagine Teaching

I’m an Ignored Student at an Ignored School, and I’m Reclaiming My Voice

An eighth-grader reflects on educational equity: “As I’ve started thinking more about my future, I’ve had to realize who I’m competing against: people with more resources, more exposure, and more support.”

Julie Hajducky

Why Some Teachers Helped Me Succeed, And Some Didn’t

At only seven years old, I could tell the difference between teachers that cared and those that didn’t—I think all kids can.

Niara Riddick

A Student Asks: ‘Are Decision Makers Finally Going to Listen to Us?’

Real student voice occurs when students are present, active, and an equal part of the decision-making processes.

David Goncharuk

Debating Social Issues in the Middle School Classroom

Fifth-grade English students cut through the noise of current events to form their own identities and perspectives at a time when their community—and their families—feel threatened.

Maria Morfin

Puerto Rico Is Losing Its Teachers. Are We Part of the Problem?

As advocates for kids, is it our responsibility to fight for policies and work toward solutions for all children—or is it our priority to help our clients address their local teacher shortages?

Ivan Nieves

Black Panther Proves That Our Kids Need More Black Superheroes in the Classroom

Let’s take a cue from “Black Panther” and ensure kids have role models who look like them, both onscreen and in the classroom.

Kenya Bradshaw

Want to Solve Silicon Valley’s Diversity Problem? These Philly Kids Know How.

Many kids of color don't get a chance to see what a STEM career truly looks like. How do we change that?

Isobel Dewey

My Next Big Challenge

After 10 wonderful years with TNTP, Karolyn Belcher is heading back to school to pursue a long-time dream of leading an urban school district.

Karolyn Belcher

Can You Learn to “Free Your Mind” in Math Class?

A Fishman Prize winner on the importance of empowering his students to think for themselves—instead of telling them what to do.

Milton Bryant

Let the Kids Speak: Alana, Seventh Grader from Baton Rouge

How challenging classes, supportive teachers, and inspiring books are preparing 12-year-old Alana to become a civil rights lawyer.

Alana W., Seventh Grade Student

Reflecting on TNTP’s 20th Anniversary

As we close out our 20th year, we wanted to share a few reflections from some of the TNTP staff members who bring the passion, heart and smarts to our mission.

Favorite Thinkers 2017: Students Get the Last Word

Each year brings a steady stream of new opportunities and challenges for educators, and 2017 was particularly difficult. In the midst of it all, there remains one clear source of hope: our students.

Dan Weisberg

Let the Kids Speak: Lewis, Fourth Grader from Oregon

Fourth-grade student Lewis discusses his goal of becoming an engineer, and why he wants more group projects (but not more homework) from his teachers.

Lewis, Fourth Grade Student

Let the Kids Speak: Jose, 12th Grader From New York City

A kid discusses how great relationships with teachers of color prepared him to succeed in college—and inspired him to pursue a career in education.

Jose Romero

Let the Kids Speak: Kolton, Third Grader from Colorado

How a class project inspired a kid to become the next Albert Einstein.

Kolton, Third Grade Student

Let the Kids Speak: Kayla, 10th Grader from Philadelphia

A 10th grader discusses her dreams and aspirations—and how teachers can help her achieve them.

Kayla, 10th Grade Student

Why It Matters to Have Teachers That Look Like Me

A Mexican American high schooler discusses having only white female teachers for the first ten years of school—and how seeing males of color lead the classroom inspired his goal to one day lead a classroom of his own.

Jose Romero

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