Thank you for your interest in TNTP. To get a fast response to questions about our organization, services or research, or to reach out to a specific staff member, please contact us using this email form.

TNTP
186 Joralemon St., Suite 300 
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Main:  (718) 233-2800
Fax:     (718) 643-9202

If you have a media inquiry, please contact us using the form to the right.

TNTP Re-imagine Teaching

A Formerly Incarcerated Teen Gives Advice to His Younger Self

Andre was 14 years old when he first entered the juvenile justice system. Now, at 18 he’s working on earning his GED and is interested in pursuing a career as a psychotherapist. Hear him tell his story.

Marvin Pierre

Is Teaching Undervalued Because It’s “Women’s Work”?

We can’t afford to ignore education’s entrenched sexism any longer—women’s capabilities are undervalued, and the highest-paid positions are disproportionally held by men.

Amanda Kocon

I Choose to Teach

2013 Fishman Prize winner Jennifer Corroy considers how the language we use to describe teaching affects students’ perceptions of the profession, and encourages fellow teachers to refine their words and share their voices. 

Jennifer Corroy Porras

Why I Don’t Believe in “Saving” Schools

For one former principal, community engagement is not just about sending teachers out into the community; it’s also important to bring the community into the school.

Nikki Grier

Why Special Education is a Civil Right

An educator discusses why she considers advocating for the rights of students with disabilities a crucial part of her job.

Ashley Cowger

How Six Kids Respond to Bullying

We asked six Philadelphia kids what they do when they see a classmate being bullied. Here's what they had to say.

Editorial Staff

Beating Bullying in My Classroom

To stop bullying and homophobia in his classroom, this educator teaches students to stand up for their classmates.

William Shelton

Is Malcolm X in Your Classroom?

One of TNTP’s 2016 Bridge Fellows is visiting schools around the country, asking the students themselves what works, and what doesn’t, when it comes to educating kids who are too often labeled as “at risk.”

Editorial Staff

3 Ways Teachers Can Support Special Ed Parents, Like Me

This special ed mom sold her home, quit her job, and hired a lawyer—all to get her son the education he deserved. She believes no parent should have to go through what she did, and has advice for teachers who want to help.

Lia Martin

For Military Brats, the Common Core Is a No-Brainer

A former military brat discusses how the Common Core could have prevented her from falling behind in school, and urges states to resist pressure to back off from the standards.

Joanna Dasher

TNTP’s Favorite Thinkers 2016: Student Edition

To close out the year, we revisited three students we met in 2016 to get some candid reflections on what they think is working in their schools—and what they’d like to see change in 2017.

Dan Weisberg

Why Media Literacy Education Matters in the Era of Fake News

A media literacy teacher shares advice on how to stay informed in the era of “fake news," and argues that media literacy must be valued and taught right alongside the traditional reading, writing, and listening standards.

Emily Bonilla

Why Social Justice Should’ve Been at the Heart of My Teaching, But Wasn’t

Years after leaving the classroom, an educator reflects on the crucial component his teaching lacked: He wasn’t spending enough energy getting to know who his students were.

Steven LaFemina

Why My Teacher Deserves the Fishman Prize

Do you know a teacher who builds strong relationships with students and pushes them to reach their potential? Nominate them for the Fishman Prize today.

The Revolutionary Act of Pronunciation

Learning a child’s name enables a teacher to see that individual student, hear their voice, and understand them as a person who deserves the immense power of connecting to their history and identity.

Leticia Hernández-Linares

How to Be More Than “Just a Teacher”

In addition to great instruction, students need support, love, and encouragement. Learning how to give them this isn’t always found in resources, books, or teacher development workshops.

Eric Hale

Raising Parent Voices to Demand a Better Education

As states craft plans to implement ESSA, there is much to learn from the ways organizations like the National Council of La Raza engage families and communities on education.

Leticia de la Vara

Where Did Abraham Lincoln Go to Law School?

At a time when new teacher pipelines are thinning, innovative approaches to giving prospective teachers with great content knowledge licensure is a strategy worth trying.

Dan Weisberg

  Older